Dec 16, 2017 Last Updated 11:30 PM, Dec 15, 2017

Talewind Interview

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Talewind Interview with Philip Machado of WindLimit Studios

The Story

You live in a small village at the bottom of a mountain. This mountain is not like the others though. Surrounding it, strong winds never cease to blow. To this village the wind is a blessing, a never ending source of energy essential to everyday life. But one day, the wind gets weaker and starts to fade. You set off on a journey to climb the mountain and find out what is happening.

What is Talewind?

Talewind is a platformer that draws inspiration for its gameplay from old school platformers such as Super Mario, Sonic, Megaman, and Rayman. It mashes up old school elements with a refreshing hand-painted art style inspired by the works of Ghibli.

You play as a adventurous young boy that lives in a small village at the bottom of a mountain. This mountain is not like the others though. Surrounding it, strong winds never cease to blow. To this village the wind is a blessing, a never ending source of energy essential to everyday life. But one day, the wind gets weaker and starts to fade.

You will climb the mountain in search for answers, but the mountain holds many secrets and dangerous creatures, with the help of your magic wind cape you will have to make use of all the different types of wind to reach the end of your journey.

With many worlds to explore and many bosses holding the doors to the next step, you are sure to be engrossed by the beautiful world that is "TALEWIND".

Check Out WindLimit Studios and Visit the Official Game Site!

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