Sep 19, 2017 Last Updated 7:38 PM, Sep 19, 2017

PC or Console: Which is Better?

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I know this question has been asked since the beginning of gaming.

Console is better right? Well, it really depends on what you consider better and what you consider worse. Lets take a look at the pros and cons of both.

Consoles have controllers, so it's easier to play. You have all the buttons you need to play the game and have a good time. The PC has even more keys, but you can change what keys do what. This can be both a good thing and a bad thing. This may be a positive because you get to control what you press to initiate certain activities within the game while feeling comfortable doing it. I wouldn't want to press the END key to switch to weapon 1 and the LEFT SHIFT key to switch to weapon 2.

You do get a say in the controls, however, there are so many cheats and hacks out there that are easily accessible through the PC versions.

Do you feel tempted? You want that infinite health and stamina? Maybe that gold?

Great job, you've allowed your temptations to ruin the game for you! Did you know it is much harder to hack and cheat on the console than it is on the PC? I said hard, but surely not impossible. Games on PC have their own cheating programs as well as developers options. You can even access the data of a video game on PC by simply going through the folders. This allows for modifications, or mods for short. Mods are another thing that you can get on Console as well, however it's much harder to do. You need to know how to use certain softwares and you have to transfer it over from your PC. Regardless, you'll have to get yourself a PC if you want to do anything like that.

PC's have removable components that allow you to change practically every factor of your gaming style. You want the best graphics? You got it! Can your consoles do that? Sure, with an axe, screw drivers, and blow torch. Anything is possible, right? (For those of you who didn't really catch on, I was being sarcastic. Please do NOT use a blow torch or axe on your consoles!) PC gamers are always on the edge of gaming. They have components you can change around, allowing you to improve your graphics. A PC is also much easier to open up, so if you have a problem, why ask someone to fix it when you can try yourself? It's much more affordable in that way and lasts longer. How you may ask? Well, every time a new console comes out, players who play console buy that new upgraded console while players who play PC will simply get the game and that's it. No hassle and no money out of pocket for big upgrades. They can also just upgrade their components to whatever preferences they desire, regardless of what that new game has to offer. PC's also have much greater memory space, or if they don't, they surely can. My PC alone has 1 TB (TeraByte) of hard drive space for storing files, saves, etc. Consoles typically can go to just about 1 TB max, and that's if you get the special ones. The highest the majority of gamers go on Console is 500 GB (GigaBytes). What about software?

PC's are more vulnerable to viruses than Consoles, unless you purchase and activate virus protection (I recommend Webroot). PC's are capable of performing several tasks at once. You can browse the web, play music, and play your game all at the same time if you desire. You cannot really say the same for Consoles. Software-wise, PC's have much more to offer than Console. Consoles only have a handful of useful things while PC has access to everything on the web.

According to this reading, I hope you have some new insight on the difference between the PC and the Console. My opinion is that PC is, in ways, much more affordable and better. However, if you like Consoles, that's your choice. I'm not here to force you to play the PC rather than Console, but to inform you of the differences between the two.

Mehmed Tiro

Mehmed Tiro is a student at Georgia Gwinnett College who wishes to study Game Design at SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design). He enjoys creating stories and bringing them to life with video games. Mehmed enjoys the company of people, but is capable of working alone if necessary as well. Although he has not finished his Major in Game Design yet, not has he even started it, he is five steps ahead of where he is as of now with a plan of his future. The kinds of story Mehmed wishes to create are the types of games that will attract players because of the personal connections he wishes to give them. He doesn't want people to only play the game, he wants them to live it. Mehmed wishes to give people a sense of the game being a part of their emotions in a way they relate. He was born in Germany and raised in a terrible neighborhood in which his childhood friend had died. He knows nearly every feeling ever to appear in the world and has an idea of how he can put those emotions on paper and into an alternate dimension we call a game. Although Mehmed loves everything to do with games, he has a life outside. Taking a walk outside, swimming, and hanging out with friends are among the everyday things he enjoys doing. If you ever feel down or just want to express an emotion of any kind be it anger, sorrow, happiness, or any other feelings, he's open to people and loves to help. He's a great listener who speaks once he thinks you're done or ready for a response. He is happy to be a part of a group in which he reviews games, for gaming is his life, not hobby.

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