Dec 15, 2017 Last Updated 3:01 PM, Dec 14, 2017

David Su’s video game musical features a unique playthrough with an award-winning soundtrack. Although short, the game provides a very relaxing experience, embarking on the archer Yi’s journey to save the village. After several playthroughs, I was craving to play more story games with a focus on original music. However, the market for these games is limited, leading me to believe that this could be an excellent platform for more original composers to feature their music in a unique, visual way.

The Journey Down: Chapter Three is the sort of title that leaves me saddened by its completion, but eager to see what the crew at SkyGoblin will do next. The Journey Down feels like a love letter to the genre, and its legacy – there are elements of LucasArts, Sierra On-Line, and other industry giants present here. But it manages to stand alone as a memorable trilogy that only improved with each new chapter. It is a worthy addition to any puzzle-loving, soundtrack-blasting, humor-embracing point-&-click fan's library, and Chapter Three is a conclusion to the tale that's just what the doctor ordered.

Beat The Game Review

With deadly bugs that prevent key gameplay mechanics, zero replayability, and an astonishingly small amount of content (<30 minutes to complete), Beat the Game is a visual masterpiece more akin to a brief bad trip at a Tomorrowland than an actual game. If you’re into audio or music production and are looking for something that will let you develop and explore it in a different light, you will be disappointed. However, when it comes to cinematography, BtG is a high nine. With a bit more care and effort from solid game and sound designers, this novelty release could have been great. And if you need drugs to enjoy music, you’re doing it wrong.

In partnership with developer Haemimont Games, Wired Productions confirmed May 30 as the release date for Victor Vran: Overkill Edition. Content is to feature the upcoming expansions, Fractured Worlds and Motörhead: Through the Ages, which will also be available separately.

Klang Review

  • Dec 15, 2017
  • Published in Action

Jack of all trades, master of none is a perfect summation of Klang. The combination of rhythm and platforming is an interesting concept that may have a future, but currently is just not quite there yet. Unique visuals and an active soundtrack help distinguish Klang from other titles, but generally ok platforming mixed with well done rhythm gaming create an awkward hodgepodge of a title that underperforms as a whole.

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