Dec 16, 2017 Last Updated 11:30 PM, Dec 15, 2017

Steamburg Review

Steamburg needs more polishing to be player-friendly, being too buggy and clumsy in its current state. But even if these problems were addressed, Steamburg would merely be a predictable puzzle adventure with lacklustre visuals, a stereotypical storyline, and uninspired puzzles.

Microïds Indie, the new publishing label of Microïds, and the studio Telehorse are thrilled to present the award-winning puzzle adventure game Steamburg, available since November 2nd on Steam.

Darkestville Castle Review

Even those who don’t normally play point-and-clicks can enjoy Darkestville Castle, but only the die-hard devotees of the genre will be able to persevere past the inevitable and frequent bouts of frustration from struggling through convoluted puzzles. An intriguing story and captivating art style round off this puzzling puzzler.

An atmospheric adventure called Growbot takes shape under the watchful eye of Lisa at Wabisabi Games. Classic point-and-click gameplay twines around puzzles like a clever vine. It’s all part of Lisa’s vision of integrating a diverse, dreamy score with biopunk illustrations and a picture book feel.

The Journey Down: Chapter Three is the sort of title that leaves me saddened by its completion, but eager to see what the crew at SkyGoblin will do next. The Journey Down feels like a love letter to the genre, and its legacy – there are elements of LucasArts, Sierra On-Line, and other industry giants present here. But it manages to stand alone as a memorable trilogy that only improved with each new chapter. It is a worthy addition to any puzzle-loving, soundtrack-blasting, humor-embracing point-&-click fan's library, and Chapter Three is a conclusion to the tale that's just what the doctor ordered.