Jun 28, 2017 Last Updated 11:12 AM, Jun 28, 2017

The Little Acre Review

Published in Adventure
Read 835 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)

The Little Acre is an Irish children’s fairytale book turned videogame.

The story revolves around a moral theme and children’s love for their parents. When Arthur goes missing, his son Aidan sets out to search for him. When Aidan goes missing, his daughter Lily sets out to search for him. Then when Aidan finds his way back, he sets out again to search for Lily. It’s like inception within inception within inception, a kid searching for her father searching for his father.

While I was playing, I wondered why the developers, Pewter Games decided to title their adventure, The Little Acre. The title seems to have nothing to do with the story. However, when I finished the game in less than two hours, I figured it out. The title refers to its compact size. The Little Acre has few areas of exploration and an extremely short story. It feels more like a demo than an actual game.

There is even an achievement for beating The Little Acre in under an hour.

The shortness of The Little Acre not only diminished the playtime, but also forced Pewter Games, to make sacrifices on other elements. The plot is very interesting and introduces players to an alternate world inhabited by strange and interesting creatures. However, the world seems underdeveloped. You only get a small glimpse into this world and your craving for more is never satisfied. There is also no backstory about this world or how Arthur came to discover it. The creatures Aiden and Lily encounter and their powers and motives are also never fully explained. Heck, Aiden and Lily aren’t explained either. In the beginning, you’re just thrown into the story without any indication of what is going on or what your adventure entails. It took awhile for me to figure out Aiden and Lily’s relationship and about half of the game before I even knew what Aiden’s name was. There are also hints to Lily’s mom/Aiden’s wife, but what happened to her is never fully revealed. There was just so much introduced throughout the adventure and not enough playtime to explain it all. When you finish The Little Acre, you are still left with many unanswered questions.

Throughout the game you play as both Aidan and Lily.

This is a unique and interesting feature that adds to the value of The Little Acre. However, because the story is so short, you switch between the characters way too often. You click on one item and complete a simple task, and then it immediately switches back to the other character. It happens so fast that I sometimes didn’t realize I switched characters and kept saying, “Wait. How did I get here?!” or “Why am I back here?!” Especially since Lily follows Aiden through the world and explores areas after he does, it started to get confusing and made me feel as if I was constantly backtracking.

The Little Acre is one of those games though that you really wished was longer. It was actually good and had so much potential that you wished Pewter Games had enhanced the story. Although the puzzles aren’t challenging and clickable items are clearly marked, they are fun. There are even timed puzzles, which is not a common feature in typical point-and-click adventures. The animation is also cartoony, adorable, and overall, extremely well done. The characters and visuals, along with the light and playful mood, contribute to the fairytale book feeling. You really feel like you just jumped right into a cute Irish children’s book and it truly shows that Pewter Games spent a lot of time on the hand-drawn characters and world. However, it seems like the developers spent too much time on the animations that they had to rush on the other elements of The Little Acre.

6

The Verdict

The Little Acre is appropriately named because it is short and has very few areas to explore. The story and plot are really interesting and the animations make you fall in love with the characters and world. The fairytale elements keep you smiling and happy the entire time you’re playing, but the smiles are cut way too short by the length of the game. You fall in love with the story and become so attached that it’s a huge letdown when it ends so abruptly. I truly wished The Little Acre had been longer, as it had so much potential. With more time to play out the story, The Little Acre could have been a huge hit.

Jessica Andrews

Whether it's dancing on the streets of Paris or swimming with the dolphins in the Dominican Republic, you can find Jessica anywhere in the world at any given moment. While she is an avid traveler, she calls Washington, DC her home and spends most of her days working as an analytic writer for a tech firm. Growing up in a Japanese household, gaming was always a part of her life. Video games brought her family together and she has kept the tradition alive ever since. In her free time, she also enjoys photography, traveling, running, dancing, and Krav Maga.

Related items

  • Life Is Strange: Before the Storm Announced

    SQUARE ENIX today announced LIFE IS STRANGE: BEFORE THE STORM, the next game in the episodic franchise. The game was unveiled with a new cinematic trailer as part of the Xbox E3 Briefing and the first of three episodes will be released on Windows PC on August 31, 2017.

  • The Long Journey Home Review

    What The Long Journey Home lacks in originality in its gameplay, it makes up for with realism in its characters and extensive narrative. It draws the player into a harsh, unforgiving universe that is as strange as it is beautiful. Wit, skill, and determination are needed to survive, but even with these, success is not guaranteed. Gamers who enjoy a challenge and the thrill of the unknown will get the most out of The Long Journey Home.

  • Telltale Developers Discuss 'The Walking Dead: A New Frontier'

    Telltale Games shared their season recap trailer for the critically-acclaimed The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series - A New Frontier. As fans gear up for the finale, find out how they handled some of this season's most gripping choices, and hear insights into the seasons' emotional core from the developers themselves.

More in this category: Heroine Anthem Zero Review »

Latest Shows

Starpoint Gemini…

A unique blend of space sim, RPG and 4X games. Conduct research and construction in your own gigantic space station, command your war fleets and heroic companions to invade enemy t...

The Search Inter…

Embark on a journey of discovery and inspiration in The Search - a story-driven puzzle-adventure set in a mysterious world where art comes to life! In an unknown world, you'll sear...

Out Soon

PC Gaming Incoming

Antihero

Become a feared and revered master thief in Antihero, a fast paced multiplayer turn-based strategy g...

Pyre

A New World From the Creators of Bastion and Transistor, Pyre is a party-based RPG in which you lead...

Fortnite

Fortnite is described as a co-op sandbox survival game and is about exploration, scavenging items, c...

Neverwinter: Tom…

Neverwinter’s Harpers seek to end the wickedness of a new death curse on the jungle peninsula of Chu...

Cladun Returns: …

Cladun Returns This is Sengoku achieves what it sets out to be with an apparent abundance of effort on the part of the developers. However, Cladun is not for everyone, and probably...

Nex Machina Revi…

Not all efforts in nostalgia end in success, but with Nex Machina, Housemarque has crafted a fast and fun twin-stick shooter with crisp visuals and challenging gameplay. Flawed onl...

Gorescript Revie…

With sparse environments that burst into color as the action unfolds, solid level design, and a low hand-holding, high satisfaction difficulty curve, Gorescript is already a title ...

Subject A-119 Re…

Subject A-119 makes a strong showing with a variety of abilities, but the puzzles, through mechanical and logical limitations, quickly fatigue the player. Puzzle addicts might be t...