Dec 17, 2017 Last Updated 11:30 PM, Dec 15, 2017
Adam Wheeler

Adam Wheeler

Adam Wheeler loves his computer, his cat, and his work-from-home lifestyle. When he feels the motivation to put on pants, he tells jokes on stage. With no real distractions in his life (friends, relationships, a reason to go outdoors, etc.), he is able to provide in-depth analysis of games and the culture that surrounds them. Adam almost never has anything better to do.

Play Warframe. Play it for more than a few hours, preferably with friends, and keep an open mind into doing some third-party research to straighten out some of these systems. Warframe takes so much of what makes ARPG’s addictive, and rounds it out with more polish and depth than anything else on the current games market.If the hooks aren’t deeply embedded by then, maybe something this in-depth isn’t for you.

All the elements are there: you’re gunning down massive hordes of baddies and you’re doing so with outstanding visual fidelity, a variety of weapons, and you’re able to cause this mayhem using big, explosive abilities. But, a bit too much of Destiny 2’s action is watered down by long cooldowns, the lazy sit-behind-cover until you’re full-health again, and the way enemies completely lose their ability to aim once your health hits the blinky-red portion of the on-screen health bar. The stakes always seem so low, the rewards so random and barely earned. It’s not a bad game, but it’s not one that lives up to the lofty expectations set by the way it’s marketed and talked about by its fans.  Miles wide, but an inch deep: Destiny 2 is not the game it should be.

Raiders of the Broken Planet just isn’t there yet. While an alpha build of the title showed promise, the title has much development ground to cover yet. Raiders of the Broken Planet isn’t half-baked: it barely got into the oven before players were encouraged to start eating the dough.

I never played Destiny. While it seemed to check so many of the boxes I wanted in a game, unfortunately, it could only be played on a platform that I didn’t own. A Borderlands-style loot system merged with a Halo-inspired combat experience sounded like a winning combination and, in many ways, it was.

The Long Dark is imperfect, but it could be one of the best experiences in the survival genre. For the impatient, single-player gamer, The Long Dark holds little promise. However, if you relish the challenge of isolation and the feeling that you’re fighting against an environment that isn’t trying to kill you, but rather just doesn’t care about you, then you must try The Long Dark.

After decades of toil, an old machinist plots his escape from Communism, through manipulation and scheming. Along the road, he befriends the most unlikely creature, an abandoned robot. Could they solve the puzzles and flee this bleak world together?

Why am I like this? Why did I let a few frame drops in Overwatch annoy me to the point of spending hundreds of dollars on new PC components that will just inevitably annoy me in the exact same way a few years from now?

If you thought Chivalry’s combat was too tedious or frustrating, Mirage is definitely worth keeping an eye on and checking out when it has an inevitable ‘free’ weekend on Steam. Torn Banner Studios has set the bar high for me, and for any fan of their previous release. Whether or not the new layer of complexity actually adds to the experience is yet to be seen, but after playing through the content currently available, I can say it’s a rewarding and admirable effort that deserves the attention and recognition it receives.

Star Wars Battlefront feels hollow. Hollow to the point that I wonder if the upcoming DLC will be able to revitalize it, and hollow to the point that there may be no one out there playing the game to even enjoy the new content at all. For $60, this game is unacceptably short on content and replayability.

If King's Quest sounds familiar to you, it's probably because you played it on your dad's computer at some point in the 80's. Or there's small chance that you're dad, and you've kept up with PC games as you march into your golden years.

If you want to get in on the Killing Floor 2 alpha, I'd be a fool to discourage you. At $30, you are not getting a tremendous amount of content at this particular time. What you do get is access to the framework of what I believe will one day be a fantastic co-op shooter; one that scratches an itch that's been untouched since I played the Left 4 Dead series. They've got a hefty amount of content to release before they can start entering L4D territory, but I just can't wait to see what they do with such a fun foundation.