Nov 24, 2017 Last Updated 1:32 AM, Nov 23, 2017

Gambitious to Publish Milanoir, Italo Games’ 1970s Crime Film Action Game Featured

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Chase the truth and trust no one.

Gambitious Digital Entertainment has announced it will publish independent developer Italo Games’ Milanoir, a pixel-packed action game inspired by the masterpiece Italian crime movies of the 1970s. The title is expected to launch later this year on Windows PC.

Set in the violent underbelly of Milan, Milanoir is a story of greed, betrayal and revenge that plays off classic films like Caliber 9 and Almost Human. Sneak, choke and shoot through the seedy criminal underworld and survive breathtaking vehicle chases to evade and eliminate those standing between you and the man who framed you. Milanoir’s pixel art aesthetic paints the unforgiving city of Milan in bright and bloody detail with a funky ‘70s-style soundtrack to cement the tone of the era.

Milanoir will be playable at E3 later this month at Gambitious’ press area inside the Devolver Indie Picnic area across from the Los Angeles Convention Center’s main entrance.

About Italo Games

Italo Games was born from the chance meeting of a developer and a designer who were working at the same mobile game company in Milan. They soon realized that they shared a common vision on the game they wanted to make. Hence they decided to put everything else aside: they found an Italian investor, hired a great freelance pixel artist from Bari and started working tirelessly to make the Milanoir dream come true. Italo Games is a young team which aims to make games with a strong focus on aesthetics and narratives.

About Gambitious, Inc.

Launched in 2012, Gambitious, Inc. is the first global crowd-financing platform exclusively for games. With a mission to create and foster a sustainable ecosystem for independent game creation and publishing, Gambitious utilizes its evolving set of creative crowd financing tools and techniques to get more great game titles funded, produced and successfully released. The company’s publishing label, Gambitious Digital Entertainment, was created in 2014 to offer professional, developer-friendly production, marketing and distribution services in order to ensure a timely return to investors and developers on projects. Gambitious has successfully established partnerships and released its titles on Steam, the PlayStation®Store, Xbox Games Store, GOG.com, Humble and the Mac App Store, as well as a number of emerging global digital distributors. For more information, visit the official Gambitious website, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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