Oct 24, 2017 Last Updated 4:19 PM, Oct 23, 2017

New Dev Diary for Grey Box and Tequila Works’ ‘RiME’

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Your Daily Updates. Straight from the Devs.

Now available is the new developer diary for RiME, the puzzle adventure game from Grey Box, Six Foot and independent developer Tequila Works.

This latest video goes behind-the-scenes with Tequila Works for a look at how RiME’s vivid art, color, sound and music design shape the player’s emotional arc, creating a world that is both fantastic yet intimately familiar.

In addition, RiME can now be preordered digitally on the PC via Steam for $29.99 / €34.99 / £29.99. Steam users will receive 10% off their purchase for preordering the game before it releases.

RiME sends players on a deeply personal journey of discovery, experienced through the eyes of a young boy who awakens on a mysterious island after shipwrecking off its coast. While navigating the island’s rugged terrain and ancient structures, players will explore challenges using light, sound, perspective and even time.

RiME will be available on PC on  May 26.

More information can be found by visiting rimegame.com and following the title on Facebook, Tumblr and @RiMEGame on Twitter.

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