Oct 24, 2017 Last Updated 4:19 PM, Oct 23, 2017

The Extreme Global Sport of Rallycross Hurtles Into Project Cars

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Your Daily Updates. Straight from the Devs.

Rallycross, one of the world’s most thrilling and action-packed motorsports, will come fully-loaded to Project CARS 2 with an array of licensed cars and tracks in late 2017. Rallycross combines the sideways dirt racing action of rally with the highspeed corner carving action of tarmac racing, all taking place within a closed course with 70-foot jumps, obstacles, and with other drivers in close proximity.

Project CARS 2 is racing towards its launch later this year on the PCs via STEAM.

Merging the authentic physics, unsurpassed visual fidelity, and superior driving dynamics synonymous with the Project CARS franchise along with a technical partnership with one of the sport’s most legendary teams, OMSE rallycross. The development team at Slightly Mad Studios signed real-world Honda Factory Global Rallycross racing stars Mitchell deJong and Oliver Eriksson as consultants to ensure the sport is presented in the most accurate and realistic manner possible. Project CARS 2 drivers will experience the rush of driving purpose-built rallycross cars such as Mitchell and Oliver’s Honda Red Bull GRC Civic Coupe on scanned real-world rallycross tracks including US-based DirtFish and Daytona, Lånkebanen in Norway, and the track where it all began half-a-century ago—Lydden Hill in the UK.

About Slightly Mad Studios

Founded in 2009, we’re the award-winning team behind the Project CARS franchise, and era-defining games such as the GTR® series, Need For Speed® Shift™, Shift 2 Unleashed®, Red Bull Air Race – The Game, and many other top-tier games. 

With over ten years of pedigree in creating AAA-games, we’re a 160-strong group of professionals working from either our hub in Central London, or worldwide via our unique and award-winning distributed development system.

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