Nov 24, 2017 Last Updated 1:32 AM, Nov 23, 2017

Thimbleweed Park update: Play Anywhere and Russian now Featured

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Greetings from mysterious Thimbleweed Park! Since their March 30 release, Thimbleweed Park's developers have been at work on behind-the-scenes additions you may want to know about.

NEWLY AVAILABLE

Thimbleweed Park now has Xbox Play Anywhere support -- that means if you own the Xbox version you also own the Windows 10 version, and vice versa.

Russian subtitles were added in a recent update. Наконец-то!

An "annoying in-jokes" toggle has been added to the game menu. Intrigued by Thimbleweed Park but not a mega-fan of all the Lucasfilm games that came before it? Now you can enjoy Thimbleweed Park without a bunch of geeky adventure game references getting in the way.

ABOUT THIMBLEWEED PARK

Thimbleweed Park is a mystery adventure game by Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick -- the creators of Lucasfilm adventure games Monkey Island and Maniac Mansion -- that brings back all the good stuff you remember from classic adventure games with none of the stupidity.

Switch between five playable characters to uncover the surreal secrets of a strange town where all technology runs on vacuum tubes (even the toilets!), a conspiracy theorist dressed up like a giant slice of pizza wanders the streets, and no one seems to care that a dead body is slowly pixelating under the bridge. The deeper you go into Thimbleweed Park, the weirder it gets.

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The announcement in this article is the author's own and does not reflect the views of The Overpowered Noobs, LLC.

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