Independent developer Fatshark today announced that the Warhammer: Vermintide 2 Pre-Order BETA is available. Everyone who has bought Warhammer: Vermintide 2, the sequel to Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide, will have access to the BETA all the way to the release on March 8.

The Red Strings Club transports you into a gritty, 1980’s-inspired cyberpunk future to solve a mystery that asks more questions about morality and human nature than it answers. The nostalgic feel isn’t overpowering or gimmicky; rather, the setting could pass as something straight out of the Blade Runner universe, yet maintains its own style and originality. Modern technology is referenced, but the backbone of the plot takes your curiosity for a ride with its fantastical sci-fi elements. Add just a dash of that decades-old pixel art aesthetic, and you have a solid entry into the cyberpunk genre.

While it is respectable that  Syndrome VR attempts to pay homage to some of the best titles in the sci-fi survival horror genre, it neither distinguishes itself with new ideas nor does it improve or even match the elements it lifts from these titles. Its campaign is filled with backtracking and padding, and when anything of significance happens, this, too, is let down by poor stealth and shooter gameplay. Furthermore, the tacked-on VR mode is not up to the industry standard and doesn't justify the higher price. The most hardcore fans of the genre may be able to overlook many of its flaws, but as it stands, there are much better options out there.

Lust For Darkness, a first-person psychological thriller, combines a duo that few would have ever thought to merge, and even fewer would ever want to see: Cthulu-like horrors and limitless sexual bacchanalia. Developers at Lunar Cult Studios staged an immensely successful Kickstarter, amassing over 500% of their original goal for their game centered around “erotic and occult themes.” Taking clear inspirations from Amnesia: The Dark Descent and amateur pornography, the pre-release demo for Lust For Darkness is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, a video game.

A Robot Named Fight truly makes a name for itself with everything it does. While not an overly plot-driven title, the story behind it all is a fascinating and fun take on a classic, which is then delivered in such a beautifully retro vessel that it is hard to believe you are playing it on a PC in your own room and not a coin-operated console at your local penny arcade. A Robot Named Fight is fast fun, a perfect way to spend five minutes or an hour and a half, and a perfect staple for anyone’s gaming library.

Suicide Guy caters to the underserved demographic of people who enjoy 3D puzzle platformers, except this serving is more of a home-cooked meal from Grandma’s house after she had gotten dementia. It’s made with love, and is good at certain parts, but in the end, it leaves a bad taste in your mouth. Graphics and level design can be clever at times, but are essentially ruined by the frustrating physics and collision, lack of any good music, repetitive sound effects, half-finished animations, and stale platforming. I want to love Suicide Guy, and I do, in a way -- I appreciate the effort that was made, but when I was done I felt unsatisfied and dead inside.

Neofeud's futuristic, Bladerunner-like world, its thoughtful dialogue that's entirely voice acted, and its fresh point-and-click puzzles make it a title worth trying — as long as you're aware that it has some annoying flaws along the way. After a slow start, Neofeud develops into a complex tale that approaches profound ideas about what it means to be sentient, what it means to care about someone who may or may not be alive, and how it could be a big problem our society could face someday soon.

The same elements and design choices in Observer that make it a cerebral and provocative failed-future experience are those that prohibit satisfaction in its gameplay. Detailed world-building shines through in-game dialogue and lore, yet falls drastically short in any actual spatial embodiment of forces and institutions. The small space in which you're trapped is a quaint microcosm of Observer's world, but after rich promises of variety and exploration, it's ultimately too micro to satisfy.

If only Diablo III was this fun and exciting to play between all the fluff and management overhead, I wouldn’t have abandoned it; Redeemer has excatly what I want when I crave quick, well-produced top-down action content. The secret sauce and energy are in full effect, and the face bashing is exceptionally fun both with hands, along with the more advanced killing methods. Зашибись!

Dead Purge: Outbreak is not fun or innovative, borrowing too heavily from many superior titles. Ultimately, the title is a zombie itself: slow-moving, mindless, collapsing readily and often.

Late Shift is interactive storytelling at its finest, a Full-Motion Video (FMV) title where Choices Matter. This gripping "crime thriller" puts players in the hot seat, allowing them to make decisions that drastically affect the course of events that take place in the London night. With seven different conclusions and choices that are genuinely difficult, Late Shift delivers on what it promises: An "interactive, cinematic experience."

Gambitious Digital Entertainment has announced it will publish independent developer Italo Games’ Milanoir, a pixel-packed action game inspired by the masterpiece Italian crime movies of the 1970s. The title is expected to launch later this year on Windows PC.

The Falling Nights is clearly a passionate undertaking; taking four years of development to make. This feels like an incredibly ambitious title for a studio that is just starting to find its bearings. Delusion Arts Entertainment shot for the moon on this one, but they'll have to settle for landing amongst the not-so-bright stars of inconsistent design choices, cheap scares, and overall graphical muddiness.

Magic, deep combat and multiplayer arenas = good gaming. Mirage deserves to be that Cinderella story in multiplayer mode with unique aesthetics and hardcore combat. It’s pretty, it’s deep as any other FPS or multiplayer brawler out there, and it has clearly been designed by skilled people with love for complex games and the ability to make them fun.em actually fun.

Reservoir Dogs: Bloody Days by Big Star Games is a third-person top-down shooter with few connections to Quentin Tarantino’s film other than it being about gangsters with color-coded names; and yet Bloody Days partially succeeds in its aspiration to revive a classic for crime and gangster films, while offering a time-rewind mechanics that helps the game distinct itself from the pool of titles in the top-down shooter category.

The Surge is a fine example of how Souls-like gameplay and structure transfers well to other genres and settings. It's a great looking game — The Surge boasts not only smooth animation, but fine details, such as the way a tarp will flap realistically in the wind, go a long way towards making this title one to show off. Combined with satisfying and unique combat, hopefully, The Surge will experience a surge of players on release.

Torn Banner Studios, creators of Chivalry: Medieval Warfare, have launched a refresh of the currently-running closed beta for their upcoming magic ‘n melee multiplayer combat game Mirage: Arcane Warfare. Live on Steam now, this update includes a series of gameplay tweaks and improvements implemented by the team based on feedback from current beta testers.

If you thought Chivalry’s combat was too tedious or frustrating, Mirage is definitely worth keeping an eye on and checking out when it has an inevitable ‘free’ weekend on Steam. Torn Banner Studios has set the bar high for me, and for any fan of their previous release. Whether or not the new layer of complexity actually adds to the experience is yet to be seen, but after playing through the content currently available, I can say it’s a rewarding and admirable effort that deserves the attention and recognition it receives.

Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition is a roller coaster ride of violence that delivers gameplay that's just as entertaining as it was in its original release in 2011. While it may not have enough discrepancy from the original to justify a repurchase, as far as remasters go, Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition should serve as an example for how to revitalize an older game.

In all, Beat Cop is a sharp, retro-centric look at 80s Brooklyn, with all its exciting cocaine, prostitution, gang wars, and overly synthesized tunes, but Beat Cop doesn't rely on nostalgia to succeed. It's a title that stands on its own, and casual racism and sexisms aside, it handily competes with similar time-management titles that have been released in the last few years.

Redie's music, game environment, sound effects, and physics work together to create an engaging, enjoyable universe. The gameplay is hard, but the feeling of finally beating a difficult level is pure euphoria. Lastly, the mastery system adds a lot of replayability to the game for players who are either exceptionally skilled or masochistic.

My experience with Yesterday Origins as a whole was wonderfully enjoyable, to say the least. Interesting characters living in curious locales, all interacting throughout different time periods help Yesterday Origins tell a mature story full of compelling twists and copious amounts of dark humor. Thought provoking puzzles add to the appeal, mixing great gameplay with great storytelling. Pendulo Studios is back!