Kelsey Erwin

Kelsey Erwin

Kelsey seeks out RPGs with the narrative clout of Greek tragedy and strategy sims more punishing than QWOP. Their favorite part about being a gender neutral PC gamer and reviewer is that it's probably the only thing no one else on the site will put in a biography. Super saiyan special snowflake originality! Kelsey always keeps a pot of hot tea close at hand, and the sign of a truly great game is when it can monopolize Kelsey's attention so completely that the tea grows cold. While a dedicated believer in the PC Master Race, Kelsey also still spends time with their old favorite console, a cinderblock size Playstation 2.

Hand of Fate 2 brings the greatest strengths of its predecessor back in this sequel. Innovative gameplay combines action RPG combat with roguelike progression and deckbuilding, and small quality of life issues in the controls do little to detract from the masterful storytelling of this title.

The massively successful Kickstarter campaign for Re:Legend, developed by indie studio Magnus Games, is a testament to the gaming community’s excitement over Magnus’s product: a co-op-capable mix of the most addictive elements from farming, monster raising, and dungeon crawling games. Rich, bright visuals alongside promises of a dynamic environment and mod support paint a bright future for the experience Magnus Games aims to deliver.

Tauronos promises an intriguing story, but since running out of lives forces you to start your journey again from the beginning, few players will have the patience to persevere and experience more than a fraction of it. Even so, the perfectly fitted aesthetic supports a minimalist but hardworking narrative, guaranteeing that players who grow frustrated enough to walk away still do so with regret.

An atmospheric adventure called Growbot takes shape under the watchful eye of Lisa at Wabisabi Games. Classic point-and-click gameplay twines around puzzles like a clever vine. It’s all part of Lisa’s vision of integrating a diverse, dreamy score with biopunk illustrations and a picture book feel.

My drug dealer, “Dub,” runs an independent cafe in the Dallas metroplex. Keep in mind, my drug is black pu-erh tea, so he's not actually as sketchy as I've made him sound. His shop's a quiet place, and even when it's busy, he gets a lot of down time. He walks around, chats a bit with everyone, and then settles down behind the counter, where he keeps his unoptimized, but still respectable, PC. He plays turn-based strategy — usually single player, usually cheap or free.

Niche – a genetics survival game is a species sim with roguelike progression, played in turns on a hex grid. It includes enough novelty to charm fans still searching for the children of Creatures or Spore, but gambles with repetitive and predictable gameplay. It's as likely to frustrate you as it is to relax you, and small annoyances tip the scale in favor of the prior. Approach with reasonable expectations about its depth and variety, and you'll raise your chances of garnering an enjoyable experience.

War of the Chosen adds so favorably to the original XCOM 2 experience that fans should consider it near-perfect as well as essential. Although some features in XCOM 2: War of the Chosen,such as soldier bonds and propaganda, are inadequately manifested, most new features blend seamlessly with the base title and solve predictability and stagnation issues that once plagued early game. The titular Chosen adversaries enrich your gameplay with increased risk and challenge, even as resistance faction allies offer diversity in how you may combat them.

Rise of Industry's polygonal trucks and farms draw onto your map with a cuteness that belies their capitalist designs. Towns that once boasted a single grocery and tailor develop greater appetites, and then consume the countryside. Toxic fumes from factories pollute the air next to water supplies and chicken farms, because it was efficient for you to build them that way. Health risks? What's that? You don't have to care about pollution yet in Rise of Industry, or competitors, or zeppelins — but that'll all change before you can say “Newarktown needs more hamburgers,” according to the development roadmap [2] provided by this fledgling title's mama bird, Dapper Penguin Studios.

The same elements and design choices in Observer that make it a cerebral and provocative failed-future experience are those that prohibit satisfaction in its gameplay. Detailed world-building shines through in-game dialogue and lore, yet falls drastically short in any actual spatial embodiment of forces and institutions. The small space in which you're trapped is a quaint microcosm of Observer's world, but after rich promises of variety and exploration, it's ultimately too micro to satisfy.

Naturally, I named my brand in Startup Company “OPN.” Within four months, I took over the market with my flagship product, 'Rey Judges' (inspired by this gif featuring OPN's editor-in-chief), is now the most profitable and widely-used social media platform in the world. It even surpasses Friendbook in “Likes” on Friendbook itself. Take that, Zuckerberg.

Who's the hero in an MMORPG? How do you know when you accomplish a great feat? Can “winning” ever feel singular? When I raided with at least one crazy Canadian (you know who you are), a Discipline Priest who kept me alive over all the other DPSers (because dwarves gotta stick together), and a guildmaster who trolled us all by crafting arrows in the middle of boss fights, with this motley crew — like so many others — I “enjoyed” [1] experiences at once common to the player base, and unique to my team.

Aven Colony is a planetary colonization, city-building simulator that salutes the memes of classic sci-fi while making a memorable impression all its own. The objective-driven campaign mode introduces mechanics and controls on a smooth difficulty curve which you can manage organically by how fast you expand your city and how rigorously you prepare for threats. While at times shallowly implemented, the trade, production, and expedition systems offer a variety of options for you to complete your goals. Simulation noobs will find this release easy to pick up, but only veterans can appreciate all the small details that went into Aven Colony's design.

Fable Fortune breaks free of closed beta and into the free-to-play wild on July 25, 2017. Should you feed it or shoot it? Is it good or evil? Most importantly, can you kick chickens? You, your rich auntie, and your dog are cordially invited to the grand opening [1] of this (a) Fable franchise inspired (b) collectible card game — albeit one with room for improvement on both of those fronts.

Ticket to Earth combines puzzle gameplay with turn-based strategy to create a smooth and dynamic RPG experience. Natural dialogue and engaging characterization pair with a direct, clean plot in an emotionally honest portrayal of individuals caught up in social upheaval. The randomization of tiles on the battlefield leads to uneven difficulty, but intuitive controls make for smooth combat. While the product as it stands only delivers one out of four projected episodes, additional episodes will arrive as free updates rather than paid add-ons or DLC.

Victor Vran: Overkill Edition adds innovative and enjoyable DLC to an already engaging base game. Fractured Worlds brings an encore of action and dungeon-delving with an increased level cap, while Motörhead Through the Ages delivers novelty and a tribute to heavy metal. Smooth gameplay and strong momentum, framed by a thought-provoking narrative, render Victor Vran: Overkill Edition a solid addition to any collection.

The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker delivers a fresh, memorable, and intricately woven tale of psychological horror. The developer's experience in crafting murder mysteries shows, although investigation of the titular Doctor Dekker's death overwhelms the simulation's promised psychotherapy aspect. Smart, provocative, and a masterclass in acting, this full motion video release falters in its user interface, but the narrative compels you to power through all the same.

Visual novel veterans will enjoy The Falconers: Moonlight, as will gamers, of any breed, who seek well-crafted stories. Its aesthetic suits its themes, and its sound plays a key role in the player's process of working out its mystery. Dialogue choices remain meaningful despite their limited impact on the plot. This title delivers an experience that, while short, is more than satisfactory.

The worst I can say about Star Story is that I want more of it. I want endgame payoff for storylines that aren't finished. I want more technology and research options because I like the crafting system. I want that rogue guy who gave me his teleport beacon and the soldier who said we'd meet again to cheer for me after the final boss fight. I want to fail even more at making friends with shrimp.

It didn't have a reputation right away. In fact, some time would pass before its very name would suffice to derail Steam community threads. Dragon Age II was the new example in what not to do.

Traffickers of any product banned in broad daylight utilized chat rooms to connect with consumers, distribute goods, and transfer payment. Bookies ditched their telephones for email accounts and websites with automated betting. Particularly, producers and consumers of child exploitation material thrived; closet pedophiles made predators rich and swapped images anonymously to complete their explicit collections.

Survivalizm's systems are well envisioned, but problems arise when they attempt to work together. A satisfying creature-life-simulation lies some ways down the road. The developer has progressed toward big promises and demonstrated responsiveness to feedback, making the project a good long-term investment, if you're willing to stick around while it matures.

Although it succeeds in both maintaining familiarity for fans of the genre and introducing novelty, Operation Abyss: New Tokyo Legacy fails to deliver engaging combat or efficiently introduce players to its unique mechanics. It boasts a solid and engaging story that starts with strong momentum, but suffers from distractions which ultimately hold Operation Abyss back from capitalizing on its strengths, resulting in a title that is simply good, despite clear potential to be great.