eSports for indie | E4i

The Blackout Club Announced

Question™, a team of industry veterans including the Creative Director and Lead Writer of BioShock 2, the Senior Gameplay Programmer of Dishonored, and the Lead Effects Artist for BioShock Infinite, has unveiled its next title. The Blackout Club, a cooperative paranormal horror mystery, steps into the light in Q1 2019 on PC.

The Station Review

Those looking for alien carnage may want to orbit on past it but fans of sci-fi exploration in space will find in The Station an “out of this world’ experience.  Puzzles and mysteries in an atmospheric setting with an intriguing storyline that delivers, it’s the kind that does not give away goodies from the start. For the patient explorer, a real treat.

We Were Here Too Review

The principal concept of We Were Here Too — having to communicate carefully with a partner — is a fantastic addition to a puzzle title. The in-game chat works excellently and limiting the walkie-talkie to half-duplex forces one player to speak at a time, which can make for incredibly hectic situations. The title is well thought through, but even an initial run is relatively short. However, puzzle fans will be entertained.

The Red Strings Club Review

The Red Strings Club transports you into a gritty, 1980’s-inspired cyberpunk future to solve a mystery that asks more questions about morality and human nature than it answers. The nostalgic feel isn’t overpowering or gimmicky; rather, the setting could pass as something straight out of the Blade Runner universe, yet maintains its own style and originality. Modern technology is referenced, but the backbone of the plot takes your curiosity for a ride with its fantastical sci-fi elements. Add just a dash of that decades-old pixel art aesthetic, and you have a solid entry into the cyberpunk genre.

OPUS: Rocket of Whispers Review

This slow-paced, emotionally-impactful adventure that is effectively a treasure hunt is suited to gamers who would enjoy being along for the ride in the healing process after a traumatic event. Sentimentality and patience are advised, as you won't find any exploding helicopters here; merely a quirky, imperfect meandering through the struggles that go along with loneliness that will be largely successful in making you feel satisfyingly sad.

AGONY - The Red Goddess reveal

As the main antagonist in Agony, The Red Goddess plays a significant role in Agony story, and her personality makes her the most terrifying entity that players will ever encounter in the game. She might be seen as an innocent, beautiful woman, but this makes her the deadliest enemy that player can meet in the world full of agony and terror.

Hello Neighbor Review

Rather than try and make a quick buck out of cheap thrills, Dynamic Pixels and tinyBuild took the popular trope of hide-and-seek horror and twisted it into something new and creative.  There is a great game buried here, as long as the development studio fixes the problems currently plaguing Hello Neighbor...  And if they can manage to really polish it, then the horror genre has much innovation to offer.

TARTARUS Review

TARTARUS is a unique concept in that it makes computer puzzles come alive with realistic representations, where most titles try to make abstract mini games out of “hacking.” The plot and overall horror atmosphere don’t come together, however. Overall, this is a solid attempt at making light programming puzzles interesting, but more work needs to be done in this area before we see a title that is truly free of tedium.

Steamburg Review

Steamburg needs more polishing to be player-friendly, being too buggy and clumsy in its current state. But even if these problems were addressed, Steamburg would merely be a predictable puzzle adventure with lacklustre visuals, a stereotypical storyline, and uninspired puzzles.

Have you heard about DIE YOUNG?

I’m sure you’ve already heard about DIE YOUNG, the visually impressive first person open world survival game set in an island in the Mediterranean Sea featured by Daphne, a brave heroine who tries to escape from this dangerous place.

Yi and the Thousand Moons – Developers Inside Look

David Su’s video game musical features a unique playthrough with an award-winning soundtrack. Although short, the game provides a very relaxing experience, embarking on the archer Yi’s journey to save the village. After several playthroughs, I was craving to play more story games with a focus on original music. However, the market for these games is limited, leading me to believe that this could be an excellent platform for more original composers to feature their music in a unique, visual way.

Indygo Review

Educating the public about mental illness is important, but a problem inherent in accurately portraying depression is that, well, it isn't fun to be depressed. Indygo skillfully builds a gloomy atmosphere: The voice acting, music, black and white art style, and narrative all work together to convey the disconnection and emptiness a person suffering from depression can feel. You may come away with a better understanding of depression by playing, but if you're looking for entertainment along with your education, you will be disappointed.

Headup announces Trüberbrook

The Kickstarter campaign of the atmospheric mystery adventure game Trüberbrook starts today. Trüberbrook is produced by btf from Germany, mostly known for their infamous late night show “Neo Magazin Royale” in German TV with Jan Böhmermann.

Hand of Fate 2 Review

Hand of Fate 2 brings the greatest strengths of its predecessor back in this sequel. Innovative gameplay combines action RPG combat with roguelike progression and deckbuilding, and small quality of life issues in the controls do little to detract from the masterful storytelling of this title.

A Hat in Time Review

A Hat In Time has grasped the title of the highest-earning 3D indie platformer ever funded on Kickstarter, and it’s no stretch of the imagination to see why. The story, the play, the graphics, everything it has instills in gamers one of the most comforting and thrilling nostalgic experiences in recent game development history. This platformer is itself a perfect modern game, with all of the classic staples players know and love, rather than being just an old game made in the present day; in a world of constant evolution and innovation, few things are as comforting as a nice easy blast from the past.

Syndrome VR Review

While it is respectable that  Syndrome VR attempts to pay homage to some of the best titles in the sci-fi survival horror genre, it neither distinguishes itself with new ideas nor does it improve or even match the elements it lifts from these titles. Its campaign is filled with backtracking and padding, and when anything of significance happens, this, too, is let down by poor stealth and shooter gameplay. Furthermore, the tacked-on VR mode is not up to the industry standard and doesn't justify the higher price. The most hardcore fans of the genre may be able to overlook many of its flaws, but as it stands, there are much better options out there.

TAURONOS Review

Tauronos promises an intriguing story, but since running out of lives forces you to start your journey again from the beginning, few players will have the patience to persevere and experience more than a fraction of it. Even so, the perfectly fitted aesthetic supports a minimalist but hardworking narrative, guaranteeing that players who grow frustrated enough to walk away still do so with regret.

Battle Chasers: Nightwar Review

Battle Chasers: Nightwar combines the classic turn-based RPG with action-RPG elements. This fun twist to the traditional RPG divisions enhances gameplay, strategy, and character customization. Despite a slow start, this title surely becomes more engaging and a quick favorite for RPG enthusiasts.

Inmates Review

Inmates grabs you right off the bat and starts yelling in your face: you are screaming and afraid, but at the end of it all, you’ll probably tell your friends that they need to come over and get yelled at, too. Besides the game world being well designed, and the sounds making you check over your shoulder every few minutes, the creativity, the puzzles, and the story offer an experience that is to die for.

Darkestville Castle Review

Even those who don’t normally play point-and-clicks can enjoy Darkestville Castle, but only the die-hard devotees of the genre will be able to persevere past the inevitable and frequent bouts of frustration from struggling through convoluted puzzles. An intriguing story and captivating art style round off this puzzling puzzler.

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