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Digital version of Paranoia Authorized, Cyanide Announces

Cyanide and Black Shamrock are fervently loyal to The Computer and therefore proud to announce the development of Paranoia: The Official Video Game, a darkly humorous RPG adapted from the critically acclaimed pen and paper game created by Dan Gelber, Greg Costikyan, and Eric Goldberg.

Carried Away Early Access Review

Despite the numerous problems that need to be addressed, Carried Away doesn't have the kind of bugs that make it unplayable. It has a solid foundation, promising to become a truly enjoyable building simulator with improvements. An example from gameplay makes a good metaphor for what you can expect: You can complete a level even if your skier dies because his corpse can skid across the finish line. This is either a morbidly humorous definition of passing a level, or a bug. The fact that you can't tell doesn't hinder you from laughing out loud.

Genital Jousting Experiences Full Release

Developer Free Lives and consenting partner Devolver Digital have today let Genital Jousting burst out of Early Access so it can satisfy everyone with a meaty new story mode featuring an inspirational tale of self-improvement. 

Hello Neighbor Review

Rather than try and make a quick buck out of cheap thrills, Dynamic Pixels and tinyBuild took the popular trope of hide-and-seek horror and twisted it into something new and creative.  There is a great game buried here, as long as the development studio fixes the problems currently plaguing Hello Neighbor...  And if they can manage to really polish it, then the horror genre has much innovation to offer.

Deadbeat Heroes Review

In this debut beat ‘em up from Deadbeat Productions, chunky graphics mix with smooth mechanics. Add a layer of cheesy one-liners, sandwiched between saucy superheroes and crusty villains. You hold something tasty and classically-inspired in your hands, if perhaps a little unexceptional. It’s not Disneyland’s Monte Christo, but an enjoyable BLT.

The Jackbox Party Pack 4 Review

The Jackbox Party Pack 4 includes six (well, five and a half) new Jackbox party titles for a quick laugh with a lot of friends or family. The different titles included can be fun, and if your friends and family are crazy, they can be a blast; enjoyment really falls down how rowdy you’re willing to be.

Darkestville Castle Review

Even those who don’t normally play point-and-clicks can enjoy Darkestville Castle, but only the die-hard devotees of the genre will be able to persevere past the inevitable and frequent bouts of frustration from struggling through convoluted puzzles. An intriguing story and captivating art style round off this puzzling puzzler.

Looterkings Goblinball Mode Review

Goblinball makes for a fantastic addition to the Looterkings package. A mischievous execution of a game everyone knows, it boasts fun and exciting characters and enemies in a natural and almost even cozy environment. The experience is perfectly complete in its simplicity, giving players a great way to spend anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours, made even better when friends are added into the mix. The best part of Goblinball, however, is the fact that it’s entirely free as long as you’ve already picked up Looterkings, and really, there’s no excuse if you haven’t.

Suicide Guy Review

Suicide Guy caters to the underserved demographic of people who enjoy 3D puzzle platformers, except this serving is more of a home-cooked meal from Grandma’s house after she had gotten dementia. It’s made with love, and is good at certain parts, but in the end, it leaves a bad taste in your mouth. Graphics and level design can be clever at times, but are essentially ruined by the frustrating physics and collision, lack of any good music, repetitive sound effects, half-finished animations, and stale platforming. I want to love Suicide Guy, and I do, in a way -- I appreciate the effort that was made, but when I was done I felt unsatisfied and dead inside.

Just In Time Incorporated Review

Just in Time Incorporated is Just Okay. It’s a great concept, but the execution is lacking. As it stands, the puzzle solutions felt too stilted and left you craving more challenge, however, the brief title is still more enjoyable than not, with humor that consistently delivers. Though fairly polished, and with mechanics that plain work, we get the impression that there's a great game in Just in Time – just not this time.

Hello Neighbor: Pre-Purchase Ready with Alpha Access

Hello Neighbor is a Stealth Horror game where you sneak into your creepy neighbor's house to figure out what he's hiding in his basement. You play against an advanced self-learning AI that counters your every move.

Playcrafting Spring Expo 2017

“Jus’ watch me, you joyk,” New York might say. While the city doesn’t attract big name game studios yet, it has a growing and energetic indie game scene. The members of this scene are gaming devotees looking for communal support and wishing for New York to support small entrepreneurship and can-do attitudes. Programs to help start-ups exist, like NYU-Poly, Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator, and NYC Seed. However, the landscape lacks initiatives which support video game developers, specifically.

NBA Playgrounds Review

NBA Playgrounds, at its best, provides some over the top arcade experience that can be highly entertaining, hilarious and even addicting to play. With a presentation and technical foundation that’s as solid as fun, NBA Playgrounds is easy to pick up but hard to master and makes for a worthy addition to any library of arcade sports games.

The Franz Kafka Videogame Review

While The Franz Kafka Videogame ends up feeling a tad pretentious in its use of Kafka’s name, the artwork and some of the puzzles are worth appreciating. Bits and pieces can be frustrating, and the short play time is a downside, but fans of experimental point-and-click adventures might still want to check this one out.

Viktor, a Steampunk Adventure Review

While not everything works, the cartoonish world of Viktor, a Steampunk Adventure shines, and the comedic-relief factor makes it an even more worthwhile addition to a point-and-click library. Although it's a relatively short journey – roughly four to five hours, give or take a few mini-games – the lasting quality of the humor and overall narrative make this title stand out in a sea of puzzle-laden adventure games.

Yooka-Laylee Review

Yooka-Laylee is a wacky 3D-platformer and the spiritual successor to Banjo-Kazooie, after nineteen long years. Ultimately, nostalgia alone should never be the reason behind a purchase; nor should it ever overshadow gameplay and mechanics so much that care about how the release actually plays falls by the wayside. It definitely brings the 1990s era to the modern day, but some things just should be left in the past.

Slime-san Review

The neon-clad, Japanese-themed platformer Slime-san is a cute 2D puzzler with simplistic yet endearing design. Requiring all of the skills and reflexes of Super Meat Boy, Slime-san is not a challenge to take lightly. While the intricate levels and fast-paced gameplay have an initial appeal for speedrunners, Slime-san lacks enough substance to keep the player’s attention for long.

The Final Specimen: Arrival Review

Final Specimen: Arrival does not take any risks with plot. It is, mechanically, a platformer, reminiscent of the 90s, but nothing new or special is presented. The protagonist, for his part, promises to repeatedly die in every funny way imaginable, and that is exactly what you will get from this game - a lightly filling experience.

The Wardrobe Review

The Wardrobe manages to pull off a fulfilling, novel story with artistic flair and only a few setbacks, setting it apart in the sea of retro-inspired, pixel-laden, nostalgia-inducing point-and-clicks. The story is witty, the vast cast of characters is intriguing, and, while the ending isn’t very satisfactory, the journey is a worthwhile one.

Hidden Folks Review

The amount of hard work that went into developing Hidden Folks is impressive. No points or timers mean there’s no rush to hurry through a puzzle, and the grandness of each level means you’re assured to spend plenty of time sifting through the world. The sheer number of things to find, and ways to do find them, also increases the replay value for anyone without a photographic memory.

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